Archive | Enviroment RSS feed for this section

Sheffield City Councils Green Fingers Gardening Competition 2017

5 Jun

Green Fingers Gardening Competition 2017

Are you a Sheffield City Council tenant who loves to garden or grow your own food? Are you at your happiest surrounded by blooms, bulbs and blossoming green spaces?

Our Green Fingers Garden Competition is back this year.

Enter one or more categories and you could win vouchers worth £100 (1st prize), £50 (2nd prize) or £25 (3rd prize).

This year we are trying to encourage younger gardeners to take part so we are offering an additional prize for Young Gardener of the Year. If you are a Sheffield City Council tenant aged 25 years or younger, simply enter the competition in any of the categories.

Complete our entry form below or download a copy from this page. Paper copies are also available from your local TARA, Neighbourhood Office or First Point.

Enter the gardening competition:
http://crm.sheffield.gov.uk:8080/Ef3/General.jsp…

Competition rules

  • entry can be for more than one category but an entrant will only go forward to the final in one category (except for Young Gardener of the Year)
  • entrants must be Sheffield City Council housing tenants
  • only official entry forms will be accepted
  • closing date is 4pm on Friday 30th June 2017
  • judging will take place in July and August. We will contact you to arrange access to your garden/balcony when the judging takes place
  • short listed entrants will be published on our website and informed by letter
  • the judges’ decision is final
  • winners must take part in publicity; this includes photography
  • no cash alternative is available for prizes
  • the competition is not open to employees of Sheffield City Council

“Broomhall Together” event 1st June 2017

24 May

broomhal poster

bh1

bh2

Image

Sheffield Green Spaces Annual General Meeting 17th May 2017 – Groups Welcome

15 May

18402769_2079289275631456_6143705057594565436_n

Image

Celebrate Spring to Summer event at Rivelins Plot 44 Community Allotment 27th May 2017

5 May

plot 44

Protecting Sheffield from Flooding Scheme move’s forward

20 Apr

flood

Picture: Penistone Road, Hillsborough

Schemes to protect city from flooding take a step forward

It’s one of the largest flood defence programmes in any UK city.

Last year we consulted the public on options being considered for the Upper Don and Sheaf catchments, as part of the Protecting Sheffield from Flooding programme.

And now, following public feedback and further technical analysis, some of the options can be ruled out, while others are being progressed for further consideration.

Councillor Bryan Lodge, cabinet member for the environment, said:  “We all remember the 2007 floods that caused such devastation to the city and, tragically, the loss of two lives.

“Ten years on, we as a council are driving forward these plans to ensure we are doing all we can to ensure that property flooding on this scale never happens again in our city.

“In progressing this vital work, we are listening to the views of communities and organisations, who are helping to shape our approach and the direction of the programme as it develops.

“This is potentially one of the largest investment programmes in the country when it comes to flood protection, and we need to get it right. We are therefore moving forward with working up more detailed proposals that are appropriate for Sheffield’s unique landscape and that will also protect the city from flooding for generations to come.”

Last year, Sheffield City Council’s flood protection team ran a consultation on a large number of potential measures aimed at protecting residents and businesses in the Upper Don, Porter and Sheaf valleys from flooding.  This consulation was advertised via Central Sheffield blog: https://centralsheffield.wordpress.com/2016/09/20/consultation-on-the-sheaf-and-upper-don-flood-protection-schemes/

Sheffield’s approach to managing floodwater will begin with slowing the flow of water upstream, before it enters the city. This involves natural flood management, exploring the use of existing reservoirs, and creating flood storage areas in existing open spaces within floodplains. These flood storage areas would temporarily store flood water and release it slowly after a severe storm. For the majority of the time they would be dry, and used for recreation or as wildlife habitats.

The next stage of the council’s approach involves containing floodwater that does enter the city, by removing pinch points and building flood defences along rivers. Rather than just walls, these defences can involve environmental enhancements, such as pocket park that was recently built on the River Don at Nursery Street.

Further flood resilience measures are also being considered. These include securing improved river maintenance in the long term and improved flood emergency responses, to reduce disruption and allow people to get back to normal more quickly after a flood.

Following feedback given during the public consultation, as well further technical analysis and design, the programme team are now no longer considering options for flood storage areas at Wharncliffe Side downstream, Oughtibridge, Beeley Wood, Loxley Malin Bridge, Loxley Rowell Bridge, Rivelin Wolf Wheel, Totley Brook and Whiteley Woods.

In the Sheaf catchment areas, options that remain under consideration include rural land management and natural flood management; flood storage areas at Abbey Brook, Endcliffe Park, Mayfield and Millhouses Park and flood defences along the river around Abbeydale Road, Little London Road, Broadfield Road and Queens Road. Removal of pinch points is also under consideration, such as the one caused by the bridge at Saxon Road.

In the Upper Don meanwhile, options include looking at the use of existing reservoirs, rural land management and natural flood management, flood storage in areas including the Roscoe site in the Rivelin valley, the Wisewood site in the Loxley valley and upstream at Wharncliffe Side; defences along the river at Stocksbridge, Oughtibridge, Winn Gardens, Hillsborough, Loxley and Kelham Island, and catchment-wide measures to improve overall resilience to flooding. Consideration is also being given to channel re-grading and weir removal, downstream of Penistone Road Bridge on the River Loxley.

Consideration of the above options will be informed by the comments, questions and concerns raised by members of the public during the consultation.

In the coming months, a preferred option will be selected for each of the Sheaf and Upper Don catchment areas. These options will include a range of flood protection measures and will be the ones best suited to protecting the city from extreme flood events, while also taking into account the consultation responses, Government cost-benefit rules and any potential environmental impact.

The outline business case will be submitted to central Government later in the year. If approved for government funding, a process of detailed design will get underway during 2018.

This will involve further public consultation with affected parties, key organisations, the planning authority and communities to ensure that the final designs are the best they can be.

The overall programme involves six separate flood alleviation schemes, to protect homes and businesses in different parts of the city. In addition to the Upper Don flood alleviation scheme and the Sheaf and Porter Brook flood alleviation scheme, the following schemes also form part of this programme:

  • A Lower Don Valley programme, which is already nearing completion;
  • a culvert renewal programme;
  • an environmental scheme to manage flooding and surface water from planned developments on the Manor and Arbourthorne estates; and
  • a flood alleviation scheme on the upper Blackburn Brook, to benefit homes and businesses in Chapeltown and Ecclesfield.

The economic benefits of the programme, should the council achieve its objectives, include the potential for 15,000 new jobs, 27,000 new homes, 40 new businesses and £150million economic growth for Sheffield per year.

Coun Lodge added: “Over the next 50 years, around 6,000 households and 2,000 businesses in our city will be at risk of flooding due to climate change, so we have no choice but to do all we can now to prevent this.

“This flooding could come at an economic cost of £1bn to Sheffield, as well as proving catastrophic for residents and businesses.

“That’s why I’m so pleased we are pressing ahead with these schemes. We will do, and are doing, our very best to protect Sheffield from flooding, now and into the future.”

You can read the public consultation interim report here:  http://www.floodprotectionsheffield.com/pages/consultation

 

New park on site of former Wisewood School moving forward

23 Mar

 

Plans for a new park on the site of the former Wisewood Secondary School in north Sheffield are moving forward.

Sheffield City Council had previously agreed to the exchange of a parcel of land from the former school site, which closed in 2011, with part of Spider Park.

The proposal would see part of the former school site developed as a new playground, while part of the existing Spider Park, off Sevenfields Lane on the Wadsley-Wisewood border, be developed for housing.

Now the council has approved an extra sliver of land in the deal, around a third of an acre to ensure that the quality of housing and impact on the surrounding area is sympathetic.

The council can now progress the disposal of the land to the preferred bidder, who will be required to submit a planning application, with the monies raised from the sale funding the installation and maintenance of the new playground.

Councillor Mary Lea, cabinet member for parks and leisure at Sheffield City Council, said: “I’m thrilled that, after a considerable period of time, this land swap can take place and a new park created where it is much-needed.

“The council’s preferred developer has made a commitment to ensuring the park moves ahead whilst also bringing a high-quality housing scheme forward.

“The existing Spider Park is poorly used whilst the new site on the former Wisewood School is in a much better location for the communities of Wadsley, Wisewood and Sutton. I’m convinced it will be a big success.
“Meanwhile, the new housing overlooking the rest of Spider Park, which enjoys great views over Sheffield, will make it a safer environment for all.”

The new parcel of land will accommodate an extension to Sevenfields Lane and the provision of a pedestrian route through the site.

New houses to the north side of Spider Park would provide natural surveillance over the remaining parkland and make the path between Dial House Road and Sevenfields Lane safer to use.

The proposed new children’s play area on part of the school site would help to meet the shortage of children’s play facilities in the local area and complete a recreational hub to complement the Wisewood Sports Centre, run by Places 4 People, and floodlit artificial pitches.

Section 106 contributions from the developer at Spider Park would help to fund the play area and its ongoing maintenance, with some additional Section 106 funding covering the balance needed.

 

Margaret Young, Chair of the Wisewood, Wadsley and Loxley TARA, said: “We are very pleased that the project is moving forward and we are very much looking forward to seeing the playground completed as it is just what the Wisewood area needs. The residents of Wisewood have been waiting a long time for this.”

 

Councillor Josie Paszek, ward councillor, for Hillsborough added: “I regularly attend meetings in the area and am frequently asked about the progress of the playground. This is brilliant news for the Wisewood area and like a lot of local people I think it will be a major asset for local people. We are looking forward to consulting and working with local residents and children to ensure the playground is everything they wish for.”

Image

Castlegate Clear Up 22nd April 2017, all welcome to come along and join in

13 Mar

castle gate clean up